We Come in Peace > WE COME IN PEACE

2012
2012
2012
2012

version.1_(house) | 2012

collaboration with Kara Stokowski

Step2 Sweetheart playhouse, wood, fabric, Goya green pickled jalapeño peppers

First Exhibited @ Helen Day Art Center in Stowe, Vermont with a public event featuring local representatives from organizations such as Migrant Justice, the Folk Life Center, and Bread & Puppet--with a shared meal/discussion portion organized by the artists entitled: Breaking the Silence: An Evening of Community Gathering with Vermont's Migrant and Local Populations.

Recently Exhibited @ the yBos 1 show in the Harbor Gallery of the University of Massachusetts, Boston campus

Our sculpture resembles a palanquin, an early, human-powered vehicle, which has been used throughout the world to ferry people and to transport statues and icons during religious processions. In the colonial era, the palanquin became the preferred method of transportation for European royalty as they traversed difficult or unappealing terrain in foreign lands.

Borrowing from the desperate process of refugee boat building found throughout Cuba during its "Special Period" of economic hardship in the post-Soviet 90s, the artists have repurposed this discarded children's playhouse and transformed it into a statement about the effects of America's interventionist foreign policy. These popular toy homes are small, mass-produced, idealized versions of the American dream, and by presenting one in the context of a palanquin, the archetypal symbol of conquest and class inequality, the artists are questioning the relationship between American ideals of peace, freedom, and prosperity, with the adverse realities of military occupations, trade sanctions, and strong-armed politics.